All Good News

About Your Memory “Namemoniks” ™ (Part 2)

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By HERMINE HILTON

‘AMERICA’S MEMORY MOTIVATOR’

“NAMEMONIKS” ™ (Part 2)

HiltonImage(I remember your face … but …)

“I remember your face, but, I just can’t remember your name.”

 Have you ever uttered those words?

How would YOU like to have been on the receiving end of that utterance? I doubt that you would. I know I wouldn’t. And yet it’s often true. You see someone, you recognize having seen them before, but your brain just won’t cough up their name.

And why is that?

The answer should be obvious, but instead of understanding the why of it you just stand there feeling like Dumbo with egg on your face. And, if the person whose face you remember but whose name you can’t recall can recall yours, the egg on your face becomes an omelet.

And so you convince yourself you can remember faces better than names.But that’s not really true.The truth is:

When someone walks up to you they put their face right in front of you. It’s like a trigger that reminds you you’ve seen it before.

So, whereas they ‘give’ you their face, you’re on your own to come up with their name. It’s as simple as that.

Collecting FIRST Names

In “NAMEMONIKS” ™ (Part 1), I wrote primarily about surnames (last names). Instead of Newman & Redford & Brando being just names, I suggested you think of Paul as a ‘new man’, Robert driving a ‘red Ford’, and Marlon eating ‘Brand‘O’.

But I didn’t tell you what to do about Paul, Robert, or Marlon. Well, collecting first names works on exactly the same premise as last names. The names Paul, Robert, and Marlon, when treated as information, might end up with Newman becoming a Pope (‘Pope Paul’); Redford stealing that red Ford (Robert sounds like ‘robber’); and Brando being a fish (a ‘marlin’).

Other common 1st names might be categorized and remembered thusly:

People named:                Are:

Howard…………………….How weird

Bill…………………………Good for paying the bill

Louise……………………….Loose

Susan………………………..Lazy

Rose…………………………Sweet or thorny

Bruce……………………….Bruised

Candy………………………Easy to swallow

Arthur……………………….Authors

Tom…………………………Tomcats

Ethel…………………………Gassed

Dorothy……………………..Off to see the wizard

Richard………………………Loaded

Virginia……………………..Virgins (But don’t bet on it.)

Often a name that brings nothing immediately to mind will wake up with a rhyme: Hetty loves spaghetti / Larry is scary / Fred is dead / Pricilla is a gorilla.

Add a slogan to some very common names and they become more memorable:

Marvelous Marvin / Jackpot Jackson / Terry Terrific / Jerry the Jester

DO’S & DON’TS

Now that I’ve laid out the collection plan for the DO’S:

1.Hear the name.

2.Connect with the Sonik information.

3.Categorize it.

Here Are Some DON’TS:

1.Don’t worry about spelling. (Pronunciation often differs from spelling.)

2.Don’t count on clothes.(They won’t be wearing the same thing tomorrow.)

3.Don’t distort faces with comic strip features. (Unless Mr. Schwartzkoff really does have blackheads.)

4.Don’t put your money on ‘repeat/repeat/repeat. (Repetition alone is mindless and involves no intelligent memory.) ….&….

5. Don’t expect faces and names to match. (But you should definitely observe a person’s face while hearing the name so you can collect the face and the name in the same frame.) Of course you should be attentive to the few times the face and the name do match (like if Ms. Mole really does have a big hairy mole on her nose, consider yourself lucky) because most names and faces rarely match…

After all…Mommy and Daddy gave us the name—the face was a surprise!!!

Playing The Name Game

In my seminars we learn to link 1st and last names together. Once you’ve heard the person’s name and given some thought to its Sonik meaning, your next move would be to sonikally link the 1st and last names together. In so doing, try to tie the thought in the whole name to the whole person.

Here’s a list of names and connective links as an example:

Donna Roberts—– Donna (prima donna) / Roberts (robbers)

’The prima donna was held up by robbers’

Joyce Miller—– —Joyce (joyous) / Miller (beer)

‘Joyce was joyous from drinking Miller Beer’

Cheryll Young——Cheryll (share all) / Young (age)

‘She’ll share all because she’s still young’

Dennis Walker——Dennis (the Menace) / Walker (a walker)

‘Dennis the Menace walked over everyone in the neighborhood’

Jack Harris———–Jack (Jack of Diamonds) / Harris (tweeds)

‘The Jack of Diamonds wore Harris tweeds’

 

A Little Test

Carefully review the above list of names and their connective links.

Now test yourself:

1. The prima ____ was held up by ______.

And her name is…

2. Someone was joyous from drinking ______ Beer.

And her name is…

3. She’ll share ____ because she’s still _____.

And her name is…

4. He was a menace and ______ all over everyone in the neighborhood.

And his name is…

5. He wears diamonds and tweeds.

And his name is…

So how did you do?

If you got all 5 right, you were paying attention;

If you got 4 right, you were mostly paying attention;

If you got 3 right, your mind was off playing golf;

If you got 2 right, re-read everything;

If you only got 1 right——–CALL ME!

(or get new glasses.)

HH

The Lady On The Mountain

www.hiltonmemory.com

[Hermine Hilton, one of America’s most popular speakers, is the author of several books on memory including “The Executive Memory Guide” (Simon&Schuster) and her latest book titled “Fuhhgeddaboutit!”(How To Stop Worrying About Your Memory). You may have heard her on Radio or seen her on Television with David Letterman; Charlie Rose; Matt Lauer; Bryant Gumbel; or a host of others. She is the creator of Sonik Memory and the memory motivator for the Fortune Five Hundred companies from Nordstrom to NASA, and is known internationally from the Netherlands to Nigeria, Turkey to Thailand, Italy to Israel, and almost all other points on the planet. (She is also known as ‘The Lady On The Mountain’ to those of you in Malibu who drive Corral Canyon.)]

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